HORTICULTURAL RESOURCE MANAGEMENT

Course CodeBHT203
Fee CodeS2
Duration (approx)100 hours
QualificationStatement of Attainment
Distance Learning Course -Learn to be a Horticultural Manager
  • Good Managers are always in demand
  • Some graduates may manage their own horticultural business; others may find employment in either the public or private sector; either in production or ameniuty horticulture. This course is applicable to all situations.
Management is all about control, and by exercising control, achieving better results. Good management only occurs when the manager is well-informed, hence the first task for any manager is to get to know the organization they are responsible for.

Managers must appreciate their own role as being the person who controls what happens, NOT the person who actually does the work, unless the situation is a small operation. A manager who, for instance, spends a lot of time potting up, weeding plants or talking with customers may find that too little time is being spent managing the nursery, and that can result in a loss of control.

In a small operation the manager is often also half of the work force, so manual tasks must be part of his routine. A good manager however maintains a delicate balance between the various tasks he performs each day, and is able to delegate jobs to others in order to help maintain that balance.

Duration: 100 hours

CONTENT

There are ten lessons in this course as follows:

  1. Horticultural Business Structures
  2. Management Theories and Procedures
  3. Horticulture and The Law
  4. Supervision
  5. Financial Management
  6. Staff Management
  7. Improving Plant Varieties
  8. Productivity and Risk
  9. Managing Physical Resources
  10. Developing an Horticultural Business Plan

 

AIMS

  •  Compare the organisational structure of three different horticultural enterprises.
  •  Determine the value of a business plan to a specific horticultural business.
  •  Determine the significance of consumer law to a specified horticultural business.
  •  Determine the duties of two different supervisors, in a specific horticultural enterprise.
  •  Describe how a budget is applied to managing a specific horticultural enterprise.
  •  Determine the criteria for selecting staff to work in an horticultural enterprise.
  •  Explain the system for controlling the collection of royalties on a plant which is covered by plant variety rights.
  •  Monitor and recommend improvements to a specified work task in a horticultural enterprise.
What is the Scope of Management?

Management is all about control, and by exercising control, achieving better results.

Good management only occurs when the manager is well informed hence the first task for any manager is to get to know the organization they are responsible for.

Managers must appreciate their own role as being the person who controls what happens, NOT the person who actually does the work, unless the situation is a small operation.

A manager who, for instance, spends a lot of time potting up, weeding plants or talking with customers may find that too little time is being spent managing the nursery, and that can result in a loss of control.
In a small operation the manager is often also half of the work force, so manual tasks must be part of his routine. A good manager however maintains a delicate balance between the various tasks he performs each day, and is able to delegate jobs to others in order to help maintain that balance.

Key functions of management are planning, organising leading and controlling the work/activities of the members of an organisation.  A manager’s effectiveness, or lack of it, can be judged from the way in which they carry out these key functions.

Planning
Management begins with careful planning to establish and meet organisational goals. Good managers use planning to determine the best course of action in a particular situation, or over a period of time, such as a year. Clear goals enable more logical and methodical decisions on how to achieve those goals, considering such factors as cost, resources, anticipated growth or decline, and market trends.
 
Organising
Organising is the process of coordinating people and resources to achieve goals. Managers who can use resources (time, money, skills, people) more efficiently and effectively will improve organisational productivity, whereas managers who under-utilise existing resources or use them inefficiently will decrease organisational productivity. Truly effective organisation depends on successful integration and coordination of many factors, including processes and people to achieve set goals, and to balance between competing goals and priorities.

Leading
Leadership is the means by which a manager influences subordinates to get things done in the desired way.  Managers can best lead by creating an atmosphere that helps and encourages people to do their best. Leadership is less about power than it is about harnessing the capabilities and motivation of others to achieve goals. Effective leadership also ensures that priorities take precedence, and are clearly communicated to all involved.

Controlling
Management is partly about exercising control, and this can be done in many ways. Control helps keep the people in an organisation on track, and helps maintain and monitor processes to ensure that their outcomes are what is expected or desired.

To carry out these processes effectively, managers must have the following qualities:
• ability to make decisions, including difficult decisions
• willingness to take responsibility for outcomes and for their subordinates
• ability to work with and through other people
• ability to balance conflicting or competing goals and priorities
• ability to analyse and explain concepts
• ability to deal with different people, and the conflicts that can arise between them
• ability to focus on goals to get things done
• good communications skills





How the Course has Developed:
  • Originally the course was developed for an accredited diploma in horticulture in Australia.
  • More than a dozen distinguished tutors and course writers from four different countries have worked on this course; to give it a strong global focus and unique relevance to the modern horticultural world.

    The following books are available from the online bookstore -click on each to follow the links and read book outlines:

    Commercial Hydroponics by John Mason

     

     

     


Managing Amenity Horticulture Sites
 
Who manages amenity horticulture sites? These days many different professions are involved in the management of natural and designed landscapes, including architects, town planners, engineers, landscape architects, environmental scientists, sport and recreation specialists, botanists, biologists, horticulturists and agronomists. Depending on the size and nature of the site, and the inputs required to manage that site, people from these (and possibly other) professions might be employed as specialist consultants, as site managers or as team leaders.

One important trend in the management of amenity horticulture sites is that issues are no longer confined to financial and personnel management, but also to social, environmental and cultural aspects which have to be taken into account to make decisions. This is now named as ‘sustainability’ and ‘social responsibility’.

The management of a horticultural site typically includes the following tasks:
1. Defining a mission, vision, goals and activities planning
2. Ensuring that the above are reached or planned within a specified timeframe
3. Managing budgets
4. Managing human resources
5. Managing material resources
6. Managing natural resources

What that means is that the manager must define where the organisation is going or, if that is already defined, how to get there with the resources available, in the time available. This usually means looking for more resources and solving problems related to the running of the amenity site together with the team that he or she is leading.

Below is an example of the responsibilities that a manager might have to perform in his or her job. The activities may be directly carried out by the manager or completed by one or more teams under the direction of the manager.

1. Defining a Mission, Vision, Goals and Activities Planning
Examples of activities to be performed here are:

• Design, put into action, monitor and evaluate the Strategic Business Plan  

• Manage your own resources and professional development 

• Determine policies for the development of amenity horticultural sites 
o Identify and confirm the need for the development of land-based sites
o Determine and agree policies for the development of land-based sites

 
• Provide information to support decision making 
o Obtain information for decision making
o Record and store information
o Analyse information to support decision making
o Advise and inform others

• Promote the organisation and its values (marketing)
o Promote the characteristics and values of the organisation 
o Monitor and evaluate the effectiveness of promotion (marketing campaigns)

2. Managing Budgets
• Prepare, approve and control budget for landscaping areas
• Estimate the resources required by programs
• Search for funding
• Prepare funding applications
• Control expenditure and adjust budget to annual variations
• Develop, negotiate and agree proposals to offer/subcontract landscaping services and products 
o Interpret specifications and evaluate capacity to act
o Prepare/analyse proposals to offer/accept services and products
o Negotiate proposals and agree service and product provision

3. Managing Human Resources
• Provide leadership which means provide vision and direction to others
• Recruit, select and keep colleagues  

• Develop procedures for Health and Safety in the Workplace
o Ensure a healthy and safe workplace
o Conduct risk assessment in the workplace

• Identify areas of improvement for yourself (the manager) and others
o Develop yourself to improve your performance
o Identify and plan the development needs of teams and individuals
o Assess and improve the development of teams and individuals
o Identify and resolve difficulties with colleagues

• Involve, motivate and retain volunteers
o Promote volunteering to potential volunteers
o Involve and motivate volunteers in the organisation
o Help volunteers change or conclude their role and contribution

4. Managing Material Resources
• Plan, monitor and evaluate the establishment and management of planted areas 

• Design landscaped areas and specify materials and components 
o Prepare designs for landscape projects
o Specify plants, materials and installation details

• Design irrigation projects and monitor their efficiency for landscaped areas

• Plan and manage the control of weeds, pests and diseases 
o Collect information for planning
o Plan the use of pest control measures
o Implement plans for pest control
o Monitor and review the use of control measures

5. Managing Natural Resources
• Plan and implement activities to improve environmental performance 
o Plan activities to improve environmental performance
o Implement plans to improve environmental performance
o Monitor and evaluate the effectiveness of implementation
 
• Develop and maintain and Environmental Policy 
o Review and evaluate the environmental impacts of the organization’s existing policies
o Produce an Environmental Policy
o Communicate an Environmental Policy

• Develop and monitor Eco-efficiency programs for best management of available resources 
o Review and evaluate the resource management in the organisation: resources available and their use, practices and work habits
o Produce an Eco-efficiency program with the team: improve use of resources through practices and habits improvements or changes
o Implement and monitor the Eco-efficiency program

The examples above are only some of the tasks that may be involved in the management of amenity sites. Depending on the complexity of the organisation, there may be more or fewer tasks. If the amenity site is very small, the manager may have to perform tasks that in larger organisations are carried out by colleagues/staff. In larger organisations the manager may just have time to lead the organisation, i.e. planning, delegating, monitoring and evaluating work.
 
 
 
 
 
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Meet some of our academics

Bob James Bob has over 50 years of experience in horticulture across both production sectors (Crops and nursery) and amenity sectors of the industry. He holds a Diploma in Agriculture and Degree in Horticulture from the University of Queensland; as well as a Masters Degree in Environmental Science. He has worked a Grounds Manager at a major university; and a manager in a municipal parks department. Over recent years he has been helping younger horticulturists as a writer, teacher and consultant; and in that capacity, brings a diverse and unique set of experiences to benefit our students.
Gavin Cole Gavin started his career studying building and construction in the early 80's. Those experiences have provided a very solid foundation for his later work in landscaping. In 1988 he completed a B.Sc. and a few years later a Certificate in Garden Design. In the mid 90's he worked as a manager and garden designer with the well respected UK company -The Chelsea Gardener. A few years later he formed his own garden design business, at first in the UK, and later operating in Queensland Australia. He has since moved to, and works from Adelaide. Apart from his work in landscaping, Gavin has been a prolific garden writer and a tutor with ACS Distance Education since 2001. He is currently part of the team of garden experts that produce Home Grown magazine.
John Mason Parks Manager, Nurseryman, Landscape Designer, Garden Writer and Consultant. Over 40 years experience; working in Victoria, Queensland and the UK. He is one of the most widely published garden writers in the world; author of more than 70 books and editor for 4 different gardening magazines. John has been recognised by his peers being made a fellow of the Institute of Horticulture in the UK, as well as by the Australian Institute of Horticulture.


Check out our eBooks

Getting Work in HorticultureFind out what it is like to work in horticulture; how diverse the industry is, how to get a start, and how to build a sustainable, long term and diverse career that keeps your options broad, so you can move from sector to sector as demand and fashion changes across your working life.
ManagementManagement is the process of planning, organising, leading, and controlling an organisation’s human and other resources to achieve business goals. More importantly though, effective management needs to be a process of human interaction and compassion. Most bad managers don’t know they are bad. They may well admit that they are a bit erratic, or they are sometimes late to appointments, but it is rare that they will recognise that they are ineffective as managers. Never fear...read here. This book has something to offer even the best of managers.
Professional Practice for ConsultantsExplore becoming a consultant. This ebook contains chapters on how to be a consultant, packaging your services, delivering the services, building your resources, finding the work and getting the job, planning and ethics.
Project ManagementThis ebook is designed to help improve your capacity to manage any type of project in any type of industry. It may be read as a stand- alone book; used as something to refer to during the process of managing projects, or used as a complementary reference to help enhance the overall learning experience when studying a project management course.

 

 

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