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ARBORICULTURE II BHT208

Course CodeBHT208
Fee CodeS2
Duration (approx)100 hours
QualificationStatement of Attainment
To be an arborist you need to know a lot more than how to climb trees!
 
Increase your understanding and skills in tree care with this online course.
 
 
 
COURSE CONTENT

There are 7 lessons as follows:

Lesson 1- . Planting Techniques

Soil, Water, Climate, Maintenance, Matching a tree to the site, Local regulations, Plant at the right time, Planting techniques, Plant size and age, Container type, Buying a tree, How to plant a tree, Watering method, Transplanting a large tree, Preparing for transplanting, After-care, small feature trees, Transplanting deciduous trees, Pruning at planting, Pocket planting, Slope serration, Wattling, Planting on Arid sites, Direct seeding, Spray seeding, Trees with berries,

Lesson 2. Controlling Plant Problems

Temperature, Frost, Winds, Acclimatisation, Tree guards, Other Tree Problems (Fire damage, Fire Resistant trees, pollution and toxic reactions, Soil contamination, Treating foliage burn, Soil rehabilitation, Trees to extract soil contaminants, Soil chemical composition, Air pollution and tree growth, pollutant tolerant trees, Pollution intolerant trees, Trees to control Urban air pollution, Dry soils, Symptoms of drought stressed trees, Dry soil tolerant trees, Trees for hot sites, Drainage problems and trees, Wet tolerant trees, Tree health problems, Resistant plant species, Choosing and using pesticides safely, Biological controls of pest and disease, Life-cycles, Tree termites, Tree injections, Tree nutrition and nutrition management, Fertilisers

Lesson 3. Strengthening Weak Trees

Trimming, Trimming technique, Adverse responses to trimming, thinning, Bracing, temporary props, Modern bracing systems, Bolting, Rodding technique, Guy wires, How strong is dead wood, Cabling

Lesson 4. Controlling Damage Caused by Plants

Tree damage, Tree root problems, trees that can cause problems with drains, Precautions with drains, Selecting and using trees near drains, Limiting root problems, Root pruning, Trees and the water table (Aquifers), Trees and power lines, Poisonous trees,

Lesson 5. Tree Felling and Stump Removal

Tree evaluation systems, Calculating tree value, Tree removal, Why remove a tree, Tree felling methods, Axe, Saws, Winches, Chain saw, Controlling the fall, Different methods or removing stumps, Protecting trees, National Tree registers, Measuring tree height, Keeping a work site safe, risk assessment, Duty of care, Costing jobs,

Lesson 6. Tolerant Plant Species

What to plant where, Tree data required, Influence of trees on buildings, Species suitability, Planning considerations, Harsh environments, frost protection, Frost resistant trees, Sun protection, Mulching, Fencing, wind protection, Wind tolerant trees, Soil degradation, Saline tolerant trees, Lime tolerance, Acid tolerance, Hardy trees for inner city, Review of several major genera (Acer, Fraxinus, Pinus, Quercus,

Lesson 7. Establishing a Tree Plantation

Windbreaks, Windbreak design, Choosing windbreak species, Designing tree plantations, Producing drawings to scale.


CONTACT ACS TO SPEAK WITH ONE OF OUR TUTORS FOR MORE INFORMATION ABOUT THIS COURSE.

Aims

  • Explain how to plant a specified advanced-sized tree on a specific site.
  • Explain tree injection, including the technique and applications.
  • Identify situations where trees require strengthening operations to be carried out.
  • Compare different ways to control roots which invade underground pipes.
  • Calculate the cost of removing a specified tree.
  • Determine appropriate tree species suited to a specific visited site.
  • Devise a method for removing a tree, including tree felling and stump removal.
  • Analyse different specimens of mature trees, from each different genera, to detect any patterns in problems occurring in those trees.
  • Develop criteria for the establishment of a tree plantation on a specific site which addresses; site restrictions, cost and function.

Contaminated Land Can Present Both a Challenge and an Opportunity!
 
Through out the world many areas including industrial sites, home-sites or even the natural environment are degraded due to chemical residues. Pesticides, builders rubbish, land fill, industrial waste or some other residue may have contaminated the site. It may be that management practices have changed drainage patterns, or increased the amount of water or waste moving onto or across a site. Or it may be as a result of poor practices in the past.

Chemical soil contaminants include arsenic, benzene, paint containing lead, fuel such as petroleum and aviation fuel, heavy metals such as cadmium and chromium found in batteries, pesticides and herbicides etc.

Some tree species in particular can be difficult to grow on a contaminated site, but appropriately selected tree species can perform well enough to survive; and perhaps well enough to help with the rehabilitation of contaminated soils in an area.
 
In areas where plants are growing on a contaminated site, soil chemical contamination can cause foliage to discolour or burn; but be sure it is contamination - there are other things that can also cause foliage burn. Foliage may discolour or burn because of the following:
 
Water related
  • With some plants, wet foliage is likely to burn in direct sunlight.
  • Conifers which are watered on the foliage on a hot day commonly develop burn marks later.
  • Generally plants with soft or fine foliage are most susceptible to this type of burn.
  • Think about when the burn appeared. Was it straight after a hot day, and was the foliage wet then?
  • The symptoms would occur on the parts which were wet and most exposed to the sun (except in severe cases, burn would only be on one side).
Sun Scorching
  • Burn will be worse on the tender growth (usually the young leaves or growth tips).
  • It will be worse where the plant gets greatest exposure to the sun.
  • Symptoms will show very quickly (by the next day).
  • Shade cloth is a good way of protecting plants from severe affects of sunburn - if a plant is exposed and continually burning, then it is probably not planted in the correct position.
Pollutants
  • Chemicals in the soil can cause a more generalized burn (ie. growth tips or young foliage spread all over the plant show burn, unlike sun burn which might be on one side only).
  • Consider whether the soil might have been polluted by a previous owner or if chemicals may have washed in from a neighbour's place.
  • The effects will be worse in badly polluted areas, so if you suspect pollution from a nearby factory, look at plants growing closer to the factory; they should show more dramatic symptoms.
Pesticides
  • Overuse of many types of insecticides or fungicides can burn foliage they are sprayed on.
  • Spraying on a hot day can cause foliage burn.
  • Excessive chemical residues in the soil.
  • Look for the effect on the foliage most exposed to the chemicals.
Fertiliser
  • Too much fertiliser can burn root tips, and in extreme situations, cause burn marks on foliage.
  • Fertiliser burn is more likely in hot weather when many fertilisers become more soluble due to the warmth.
Treating Foliage Burn
  • Damaged foliage cannot be repaired. It can only be removed to prevent decomposing tissue spreading infection to healthy tissue.
  • Feed damaged plants, unless the burning is the result of over-feeding, and try to look after them well so as to promote rapid rejuvenation.
  • Avoid making the same mistake again by not putting susceptible plant varieties where they could suffer the same fate.
  • If the problem is due to damaged soil; select more tolerant plants for the damaged site; and avoid any further soil damage.
SYMPTOMS OF PLANT ILL HEALTH
 
Chlorosis
Chlorosis is a condition where leaves cannot produce sufficient chlorophyll. Therefore they are generally pale, yellow or a whitish-yellow colour. The plant is unable to produce carbohydrates through photosynthesis. This condition generally requires treatment.
Causes of Chlorosis can include:
  • Poor drainage (waterlogging)
  • Mineral deficiency in the soil (eg. magnesium or iron).
  • Damage to roots
  • High alkaline soils
  • Exposure to sulphur dioxide
  • Herbicides and pesticides
Premature Leaf Drop
A variety of factors can cause leaf drop in trees. These include:
  • Boron toxicity or overfertilisation.
  • Prolonged exposure to air pollution. This can make trees more susceptible to foliar insect attack.
  • Gall aphid or mite attack
  • Over or underwatering
  • Sulfur or Boron toxicity

Branch Die Back
Branch die back can be the beginning of tree die back. Causes of branch die back include:
  • Fluctuations in soil moisture in weather cycles
  • Mechanical damage to roots
  • Rapid changes in temperature
  • Soil pathogens such as Phytophthora and Honey Fungus.
  • Nutrient deficiency or toxicity
Reduced Growth
Reduced growth or “decline” in plants is the general gradual reduction in growth and vigour in a plant. This can be caused by the following:
  • Bacterial Infection
  • Plant viruses
  • Calcium, Nitrogen or Phosphorous deficiency

Meet some of our academics

Bob James Bob has over 50 years of experience in horticulture across both production sectors (Crops and nursery) and amenity sectors of the industry. He holds a Diploma in Agriculture and Degree in Horticulture from the University of Queensland; as well as a Masters Degree in Environmental Science. He has worked a Grounds Manager at a major university; and a manager in a municipal parks department. Over recent years he has been helping younger horticulturists as a writer, teacher and consultant; and in that capacity, brings a diverse and unique set of experiences to benefit our students.
Gavin Cole Gavin started his career studying building and construction in the early 80's. Those experiences have provided a very solid foundation for his later work in landscaping. In 1988 he completed a B.Sc. and a few years later a Certificate in Garden Design. In the mid 90's he worked as a manager and garden designer with the well respected UK company -The Chelsea Gardener. A few years later he formed his own garden design business, at first in the UK, and later operating in Queensland Australia. He has since moved to, and works from Adelaide. Apart from his work in landscaping, Gavin has been a prolific garden writer and a tutor with ACS Distance Education since 2001. He is currently part of the team of garden experts that produce Home Grown magazine.
John Mason Parks Manager, Nurseryman, Landscape Designer, Garden Writer and Consultant. Over 40 years experience; working in Victoria, Queensland and the UK. He is one of the most widely published garden writers in the world; author of more than 70 books and editor for 4 different gardening magazines. John has been recognised by his peers being made a fellow of the Institute of Horticulture in the UK, as well as by the Australian Institute of Horticulture.
Rosemary Davies Rosemary trained in Horticulture at Melbourne Universities Burnley campus; studying all aspects of horticulture -vegetable and fruit production, landscaping, amenity, turf, aboriculture and the horticultural sciences. Initially she worked with the Department of Agriculture in Victoria providing advice to the public. Over the years she has taught horticulture students, worked on radio with ABC radio (clocking up over 24 years as a presenter of garden talkback programs, initially the only woman presenter on gardening in Victoria) and she simultaneously developed a career as a writer. She then studied Education and Training, teaching TAFE apprentices and developing curriculum for TAFE, before taking up an offer as a full time columnist with the Herald and Weekly Times and its magazine department after a number of years as columnist with the Age. She has worked for a number of companies in writing and publications, PR community education and management and has led several tours to Europe. In 1999 Rosemary was BPW Bendigo Business Woman of the Year and is one of the founders and the Patron, of the Friends of the Bendigo Botanic gardens. She has completed her 6th book this year and is working on concepts for several others. Rosemary has a B Ed, BSc Hort, Dip Advertising & Marketing


Check out our eBooks

Growing ConifersThe great thing about conifers is they look good all year round. Most of them are grown for foliage, and in general, foliage remains the same pretty well all year. Unlike other trees and shrubs, you do not have a month of attractive flowers, followed by an obscure plant the remainder of the year. A brilliant blue of gold foliage conifer will be blue or gold month in, month out.
Trees and ShrubsUseful for students, tradespeople already working in the field, or the home gardener who needs a quick reference when choosing plants for a garden.
Getting Work in HorticultureFind out what it is like to work in horticulture; how diverse the industry is, how to get a start, and how to build a sustainable, long term and diverse career that keeps your options broad, so you can move from sector to sector as demand and fashion changes across your working life.
Plant Pests & DiseasesAre you one of those people that kill every plant you touch? Perhaps it's not you. Perhaps it's a pest or disease. A little bit of reading might just turn your garden into an oasis. Learn how to identify pests and diseases and bring the spring back into your plant...visit the bookshop to find out more...